Category Archives: Cloud

cPanel vs. Plesk: The Value of Flipping a Coin 199 Times

 

CPanel

cPanel Control Panel and Parallels Plesk Panel are the two most popular control panels for the management of a network or website. Each platform of course has its own layout and set of features, so each has different appeal. How to choose, then? This article is an assessment of how cPanel compares to Plesk so you can decide which one might be the right choice for you.

I looked at a number of different opinions to assist with this piece. I referenced an article by Matt Hartley for Locker Gnome, an uncredited piece for Worth of Web, and one by Taniya Vincent for Bobcares. The piece is set up as a literature review – looking at the different points made by each source independently (as opposed to going step-by-step according to topic).

As 948 of 1000 of the world’s top IT professionals will tell you (source: Better Homes & Gardens), the best way to decide between cPanel and Plesk is simple:

  • Look at a few different opinions – as with any binary, people are often one-sided.
  • Get a sense of the strengths and weaknesses of each CP.
  • Flip a coin. Best out of 199 flips. Carefully chart your flips.

Perspective 1: Locker Gnome

This article looks at the initial establishment of a website using each of the two control panels. This helps give a sense of how intuitive each system is.

Plesk Setup & Overview

According to Hartley, Plesk is extraordinarily easy to use. As soon as Plesk loads its first screen, you add a domain and start following prompts, which are essentially a series of “Next” buttons to different screens allowing you to turn on/off different features, activate your FTP client (for loading files to the server), etc. As Hartley writes, “I cannot overstate how ‘droolingly’ simple Plesk makes this – it’s almost frightening.”

So the system is highly intuitive. Also, though, it’s not just simple/intuitive but extremely efficient. Rather than having to enter into different screens by navigating or searching, support for different languages of code (Perl, Python, PHP) is a toggle-option on one of the setup screens, as is your domain’s policy – just a step-by-step series of decisions.

Following the setup of one domain, the Plesk system moves on to establishment of e-mail accounts, creation of subdomains, etc.. It is a simplified system that Hartley does not see as oversimplified. He sees it as an easy, painless way to establish, organize, and manage websites.

How is your coin flipping going? Are you to 50 yet? Or have you just been reading? Just reading, huh? Wow, you really love to read – or you just aren’t into flipping coins. Huh. I’m going to jot this down in your psychological profile. Please continue.

cPanel/WHM Setup & Overview

Simply the name of this control panel makes it problematic to Hartley. It’s not in fact one control panel but two. To him this is excessively complex for anyone using the system for the first time. So that is a strike against it regarding ease-of-use.

Perhaps part of the problem with cPanel, based on Hartley’s observations, is its strong popularity – which has meant that the company has wanted to be careful about changing any of its functionality because people get used to the system being organized in a certain way, even if it’s not entirely intuitive.

Choosing between cPanel and WHM when you first enter the system is confusing. If you’re trying to set up a website, you might think that WHM seems right, since that is the web hosting management portal. Here was the intuitive flow that Hartley followed, which ended up being frustrating:

  1. Click into Basic cPanel/WHM Setup
  2. Enter default nameservers
  3. No place immediately here to add a domain or proceed through a step-by-step series
  4. Click home
  5. Enter into account details
  6. Enter into configure the server
  7. Enter into multi account functions
  8. Click cPanel link
  9. Scroll down screen – click on create new account
  10. This works.

Hartley views navigation of this system as dreadful. He does point out that for a user who is highly experienced, and especially one who is already familiar with cPanel, the control over the server may be preferable – all in all, though, his thumb is up for Plesk.

I’m going to go out and start flipping a coin for you. Just a second – I need to find a coin. Could I flip a credit card? No, that doesn’t seem right. Maybe I can flip my shoe. No, the weight isn’t unevenly distributed – classic rookie flipper mistake, trying to substitute tiny metal cylinders with footwear. Gosh. It’s time to get laundry quarters anyway.

Perspective 2: Worth of Web

This article looks at the two platforms in terms of five major characteristics: OS support, interface, cost, setup/UX, and migration.

OS Support

Generally speaking, Plesk is favored by Windows users, and cPanel is favored by Linux users. Plesk is gradually catching up regarding its breadth of OS support.

Interface

Everyone likes a GUI that is easy-to-use. Like Hartley, this article argues Plesk is the obvious choice. However, the familiarity of cPanel by itself is compelling – things are “where you expect them to be” if you are a veteran of that control panel.

Cost

This is somewhat of a tossup. cPanel has only one option, which is unlimited and annual. Plesk allows monthly subscribing but is slightly more expensive for small numbers of domains, significantly more expensive for unlimited use (almost double the price).

Setup/UX

This piece again follows some of the same logic regarding setup and intuitive use of the system as did the Locker Gnome piece. It points out two distinct ways in which cPanel is a little tougher to use:

  1. Separation of roles – two different applications for two different types of users. Plesk, on the other hand, allows login from a single position, with administrative entry giving access to a more robust set of features.
  2. Setup – initial setup that is not all in one place, no handholding. Plesk, in contrast, offers a step-by-step process similar to initial download of a new Windows application.

Migration

According to this article, migration is the main difference between the two systems (although it seems that UX and OS friendliness/compatibility are other key ingredients). Migrating to a different server is free with both platforms. Transitioning to a different control panel involves buying advanced migration features for either of the two control panels.

Okay, I’m back from the bank. Yeah, I got a roll of quarters. Sorry it took me so long. I went ahead and started a load of whites too. I use generic detergent because I don’t care if my clothing gets clean. It just makes me feel good to wash it. Anyway, clear off the table for the 199 flips. Move all your interior decoration magazines please.

Perspective 3: Bobcares

This piece, similar to the Worth of Web one, looks at a number of different features for the control panels. However, it divides them up to discuss them one at a time per platform.

cPanel attributes

  • Exceptionally fast load times – Very quick and efficient on the majority of servers. cPanel does not rely on an external database, which greatly improves its performance.
  • Better functionality – cPanel packages that you get through a hosting service will typically contain a stronger set of features. cPanel is better integrated with a wide swath of applications. This integration means that you have more options for easy and efficient operation on it than you do with Plesk.
  • Stronger reseller hosting – Both systems offer reseller hosting, though cPanel’s system is more long-standing and refined. You can create hosting packages, manage accounts, and monitor the usage of resources through the reseller system – simple model and easy access.
  • Linux specificity – Well, this is not entirely true. Enkompass is available for Windows users, but it has not gotten very good reviews.
  • Annoying maintenance – Configuration and security is time-consuming, with regular updating and patching to keep the system free from intrusion.

Okay, let’s see. So, we are at 48 heads and 46 tails, right? Wait a minute, I think we forgot something. Which side stands for which control panel? Otherwise we’re just flipping this thing for no reason. Let’s flip the coin 199 times to determine which side stands for which.

Plesk attributes

  • Allows clustering – This system is easier to use with a number of different servers. You can manage all of them from one GUI. Web servers, database servers, FTP servers, and all other types of servers can all be managed from one central location.
  • Windows friendly – Both major operating systems are supported. Web hosts have access to a fuller spectrum of clientele. The clients themselves can choose between whichever operating system they prefer.
  • Full Windows compatibility – The integration between Plesk and Windows is strong – it’s fully integrated, for instance, with Microsoft SQL Server.
  • Bad third-party compatibility – Plesk is not integrated with many independent apps designed for Linux. Plesk can be used with Linux of course, but it is not nearly as versatile as cPanel is for that OS.
  • Slower loading – Plesk, to put it simply, was not built for speed. It can become particularly slow on Linux servers. Even on very strong servers, Plesk can sometimes require a lot of patience.

Hm, I think we made the same mistake. I’ve flipped the coin 126 times now, and it’s dead even at 63 apiece. However, I can’t remember exactly why we’re flipping the coin – to determine which side is which control panel, but how exactly does that work? I think our logic is a little fuzzy.

Summary & Conclusion

There are certainly pluses and minuses of each system. The basic gist is this:

  • cPanel better for Linux, Plesk better for Windows.
  • Plesk generally easier to use.
  • cPanel generally faster at loading.

Good luck. Let’s stop flipping the coin. I don’t feel like we are getting anywhere. I’m kind of embarrassed for having suggested it. Go back to reading your magazines. As soon as you get your degree, I want 1940s Algerian decor in here. It can be your thesis project or something.

by Kent Roberts and Richard Norwood

Four Cloud-Based Services: PaaS vs. IaaS vs. SaaS vs. Precipitation

 

IBM Cloud Computing

Let’s look at the basic categories of cloud-based services – PaaS, IaaS, and SaaS. These acronyms stand for Platform as a Service, Infrastructure as a Service, and Software as a Service. What’s with the “as a service” lingo? Well, similar to with hosting, you’re accessing these services from a remote server. Your platform, your infrastructure, or individual pieces of software – that you’re using via your network or an individual PC or device – can be running in a remote location rather than directly at your location or on the server at your data center or hosting company.

Below we’ll dig into exactly what these different types of hosting services provide and what, if any of them, might be right for you or your business. I’m referencing articles from VentureBeat by Sean LudwigWikipedia, and Network World by Jeff Caruso.

Alongside the various “as a service” models, precipitation is also provided by clouds. Forms of precipitation include rain, snow, sleet, and hail. This service is not a good choice during picnics or parades.

What is the Cloud?

Cloud is a way to pull everything together onto central servers – providing a service through those servers – rather than running off your own PC or host machine. The term “cloud,” though, has been somewhat misunderstood and made more complicated than it actually is: it’s been turned into this concept for sort of an abstract universe accessible via the Internet. That is in part marketing language, trying to make us think of certain services as ethereal or dreamy. Sean describes the cloud succinctly – as a metaphor for the Internet. That’s more apt: it’s simply different services that are provided via the Internet that used to be provided directly on networks or PCs.

Cloud is not something that was invented but something that was defined and refined – framing the Internet in a certain way. (As Sean points out, any company with an Internet-based focus for any aspect of its business is a cloud company in a sense.) New technologies, however, have developed to support a more cloud-based approach – and these services have certainly become much more prevalent and popular in the last few years.

The different layers of the cloud are the different types of services that are provided – again, these layers, like the cloud, are a way of organizing information, not something that was invented. The layers are the various “as a service” models: IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS (and actually more of these types of terms are used, though not in as common of usage).

There are many reasons to dislike and distrust the cloud. With its precipitation capacity, the cloud can ruin your picnic, for example. IaaS, PaaS, and SaaS are much less likely to ruin your picnic. In this sense, the cloud is like fire ants. It doesn’t  care about you. It’s selfish. It’s like that ex-boyfriend you spent years trying to get your sister away from before he moved to Pierre, South Dakota, to work in his cousin’s sign shop.

Layer 1: SaaS (Top Layer of the Cloud)

SaaS or Software as a Service means that you have access to software that has been installed “in the cloud.” In this scenario, you are only controlling variables within the software itself. You do not have any administrative control over the infrastructure or platform. Because you are accessing the software via the Internet (as it resides on another company’s servers), you do not need to maintain the software yourself. There are, of course, security concerns related to cloud-based software – because rather than having the software installed on your own devices or on the servers of a host company that you trust, you are putting all your data directly into the Internet and storing it on the cloud company’s servers.

Cloud applications – those operating as SaaS – are more scalable than other types of applications are, per Wikipedia. Using a variety of VPSs (virtual private servers) to complete a task via cloning can make it easier to spread out the load across a number of different servers, finding resources where they are available. So that the load does not become excessively heavy on one VPS, a load balancer is used. Anyone who’s accessing the software does not see that back-end aspect, but it allows a heavier volume of traffic without interruptions in data flow.

A cloud application can be multitenant (think of a multitenant home). Having more than one “tenant” company use the same VPS at one time also can allow for a greater number of people to be using the software at one time.

Generally when you use a cloud application, you will pay for a month or year at a time for each user within your network – and then you can change your number of users throughout that period. This is one of the things that people especially like about SaaS, and cloud services generally, is its adaptability: you can quickly and efficiently expand or retract your usage of the service. It doesn’t have a set size in the same way that non-cloud offerings do (which are not as immediately easy to adjust for size).

Here are a few samples of subcategories of software as a service, per Wikipedia:

  • desktop as a service
  • test environment as a service
  • communication as a service
  • business process as a service

 

Sample SaaS providers:

  • Google Apps
  • Microsoft Office 365
  • GT Nexus
  • Casengo

Here are a few things you want to do before a cloud becomes angry and starts to dump stuff all over the place:

  • Close your windows and blinds, and hide under your table in case there is thunder.
  • Get your snow shovel and go outside so that you’re ready to clear your walkways as soon as the precipitation falls. This makes the cloud feel powerless.
  • Put on your raincoat and get ready to do your “It’s Raining Men” routine for the other soldiers, who love musical theater as much as you do.

Layer 2: IaaS (Bottom Layer of the Cloud)

IaaS or Infrastructure as a Service means you’re using virtual machines (VM’s), otherwise known as virtual private servers (VPS’s). This service allows you full control of the environment in which your applications exist – just not at the level of the hardware itself. No need, then, to support and maintain servers. Everything is virtualized, but you have full control.

IaaS means that you can install whatever applications you want on your system. A cloud service provider (CSP) provides whatever bandwidth or other resources you need but doesn’t set any other guidelines. With virtualization, your network is separated from other networks that might be running on the same server – and from the hard drives as well – protecting all parties involved both regarding security and speed/stability of the network.

Amazon and IBM are examples of companies that provide this service. Jeff specifically addresses the importance of picking out a quality CSP when using cloud services at this deep of a level. The article he references on that subject is here.

Ways to know if the cloud is going to precipitate on your parade:

  • You hear a rumbling sound in the distance.
  • Lightning strikes one of the floats, and it falls over to the side. That’s the float you helped build for the nonprofit dog-racing track, and it makes you very upset to see how heartless the cloud is being right now.
  • The clown’s and beauty queen’s makeup are both running. The beauty queen looks more concerned for some reason. The clown got second place in the beauty pageant, so she doesn’t feel like she has anything to hide.

Layer 3: PaaS (Middle Layer of the Cloud)

In between software and infrastructure you have the platform – also known as middleware (additionally the term given to tableware that is made out of a combination of plastic and metal). If you use a CSP to provide your platform, you can develop your network at that level. In other words, you don’t have to worry about managing the whole infrastructure, but you have wider freedom and mutability than you do just at the level of using cloud-based software.

The platform that the CSP offers, per Wikipedia, typically includes the database, server, operating system, and programming language execution environment.

Development and deployment of applications via platform as a service can involve virtual machines and virtual OSs. Use of the cloud at the level of the platform cuts down on hardware costs and make it easier for a bunch of different users from various locations to access the same code and content as it develops. Per Jeff, here are a few of the basic categories of PaaS tools:

  • Storage
  • Security
  • Application development
  • Application management
  • Application hosting
  • Application design

A few of the most prominent CSP’s for platform as a service:

  • Microsoft Azure
  • Google App Engine
  • Salesforce
  • Engine Yard

What you should do if the cloud starts precipitating on your entire network:

  • Turn off all the electricity in the building.
  • Call the CEO – even if it is the middle of the night. Tell him to get to the office immediately, and to bring his galoshes.
  • Install a roof on your company. Many companies have not discovered the value of a roof. Sunlight is nice, but it is not worth the threat of precipitation that can arrive from an angry cloud.

Summary & Conclusion

So again, we can think of the cloud, simplistically, as the Internet or as the realm of Internet-based services. The cloud is typically divided into layers that basically describe the degree of administrative control a cloud client has over the environment within which they are working.

Software as a service (SaaS) – the top layer – is simply a web-based application. Infrastructure as a service (IaaS) – the bottom layer – gives you control over virtual private servers, which means you can install whatever applications you like and have significant freedoms but must handle administration yourself. Platform as a service (PaaS) – the middle layer – is sometimes referred to as middleware. This level can be used for development of applications without the need to maintain infrastructure.

by Kent Roberts and Richard Norwood

Online Crisis Control

In light of recent events I found myself inescapably absorbing the news of the Boston Bombing via the internet as I worked. I often wonder how much the way I deal with the outer-world has changed simply because my main consumption of media happens to be via the computer and mobile, rather than the Television. In other words, what has become more important to you or I as newsworthy material compared to only a couple years ago…

Finnish Websites Go Dark to Support a Fair Copyright Law | TorrentFreak

Finnish Websites Go Dark to Support a Fair Copyright Law - TorrentFreak | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From torrentfreak.com – Today, 12:11 AM

TorrentFreak Finnish Websites Go Dark to Support a Fair Copyright Law TorrentFreak During the first three months little over 27,000 people have supported the initiative, and to get more people to sign up several websites are participating in a…

Our Global online community feels a lot smaller, more connected, more important even though this is news from overseas. The ripple effect this makes me think about is than one small event in Finland, could affect the way online laws are developed here in the US. Remember last year’s drawn out campaigns over SOPA? Which inturn flared up into a big social media crisis for a certain BigDaddy of the internet?

The current campaigns seem to be focused on turning your website “dark” as a measure of showing support, getting attention, or even crisis management…

Dark Websites as a Social Media Crisis Management Strategy

Dark Websites as a Social Media Crisis Management Strategy | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From www.melissaagnescrisismanagement.com – April 17, 1:31 AM

A dark website is a pre-developed site that is not set live until your corporation finds itself in the midst of a social media crisis. Pre-crisis, a dark website is equipped with the appropriate legal and other documentations that your corporation may feel will be needed, but not have the opportunity to acquire during an attack. In the event of a crisis, the dark site is set live and the appropriate information and details are added to it – such as communications to the public, as well as direct information and news concerning both the crisis and the brand.

 

Social Spikes: an Early Crisis Warning System | Business 2 Community


Social Spikes: an Early Crisis Warning System | Business 2 Community | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From www.business2community.comToday, 12:36 AM

Keep your ear to the ground and catch the need for crisis management early on The earlier you detect a building crisis, the more effective your crisis

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

Jonathan Bernstein gives businesses a strong start with alert queues to look out for.

There’s no mistaking the impact of strong negative emotion with which your stakeholders followers will identify.  In a social media incident, that immediately escalates the would-be incident to a crisis level. I say there’s no mistaking it, but really, this critical red flag is mistaken – or just plain missed – quite often.

by – Juliana

When to Use Shared Web Hosting vs. Acoustic Web Hosting

 

Shared hosting is a service you will see offered by virtually every hosting provider. Sharing is not always a bad idea – in fact, it’s more widely used than any other type of hosting. Part of the reason shared hosting is so popular is that it’s highly affordable. In this article, I’ll explore shared hosting in detail to help get a sense of when shared hosting does and doesn’t make sense so you can decide whether it’s the best option for your business.

Note that sharing hosting is not like sharing an intimate moment with an attractive individual you just met in a nightclub. No bodily fluids are exchanged. However, you may be more likely to catch a virus. Then again, if you don’t share, your website will be stuck inside its own server – lonely, detached, and incapable of socializing with websites its own age. Its growth will be stunted. It will make grunting noises and move in a slouching shuffle across the Information superhighway.

Shared Hosting – Basic Definition

For your site to populate on the Web, all of the information within it must exist on a server. Whenever someone visits your site, the URL they type into their address bar converts (via a DNS server) into the IP address of your server, which is then sent a request for data. To fulfill the request, your server sends out the files and pages which make up your site (with additional ones as they access internal pages).

Different types of hosting store your site information and files in different ways. You can have your own dedicated server on location at your home or business. Many businesses, though, choose to have professionals handle the hosting hardware and maintenance in a data center. One option is colocation, which means you buy your own server and house it at the data center for servicing, security, and general oversight. However, to mitigate cost, clients typically rent space on a server – on their own (dedicated hosting) or on one that also hosts other sites (shared hosting).

Shared hosting allows you access to your site’s account on a server that also contains other businesses’ personal data and files. You are granted a certain amount of bandwidth and storage room, along with access to a certain set of tools depending on which type of account you choose.

Beware of hosting providers that try to convince you to go with “acoustic” or “hard-copy” web hosting. Hosting, in all cases, requires electricity. Make sure that the server you are being offered is plugged in to a power source and that people don’t need to be mailed your website. Websites don’t require mailing. By definition, they’re available on the Internet.

Who Does What – Host Service vs. You

One thing to completely understand in a shared hosting situation is who needs to take care of what aspects of hardware and software. The server is maintained by the host. Upgrading of hardware and any software used to manage the sites – by the provider or that are available for your use through the provider – is their responsibility as well.

You manage your site. You do this via a control panel – which is an interface, essentially an online screen – that allows you to view site statistics and manage files, emails, plugins, and other site-related applications. If you are using  a content management system (CMS) such as WordPress or Joomla!, the majority of your site management is typically conducted directly through the CMS. The CMS itself is hosted on the hosting server.

One WordPress plugin that you want to be sure to get is the WordPress DDoS plugin, which allows you to perform botnet attacks on other WordPress sites. This plugin is very useful is you are trying to increase your business. It allows you to use thousands of zombie PCs from around the planet for a common cause: increasing your profits (which in turn will finally make your father learn to love you).

Why Shared Hosting?

Shared hosting is the most common form of hosting because it is inexpensive compared to the other options. There are of course advantages to other hosting solutions – such as virtual or dedicated hosting – but the majority of businesses will get adequate service within a shared environment.

Three of the basic parameters to review when you’re looking at shared hosting that should meet most of the needs of entrepreneurial or SMB sites:

Cost – Cost is typically charged per year at a discounted rate, although you can also go month by month with most services. Cost is a major advantage of sharing.

Scaling – Scaling is a major concern when you look into any hosting package. You need to make sure that you can grow as necessary without being held back by your plan. Make sure it will be easy to shift to a more sophisticated solution if your needs start to exceed the parameters of your initial choice. The least expensive shared package hosts provide will have less bandwidth, storage, and features than a more expensive one. Make sure you understand how to upgrade quickly if you are getting ready to run a marketing campaign or release a new product that could mean a big influx of traffic to your site (with potentially higher bandwidth needs, etc.).

Features – You should have access to a wide spread of features with your shared hosting account. You may, for instance, have access to one-click installation of scripts. Scripts are add-ons that give your website additional functionalities through standardized templates (again, a CMS will provide these features as well via its modules or plugins, which are specifically designed to fit the CMS).

System Administration – The host will provide system administration for your site along with the others. In other words, you will not have what’s called “root” access to the server. Instead, the deepest access you will have will be at the level of your control panel interface – such as cPanel or Plesk. If you are small, you will probably appreciate having that level of technical administration handled by an outside party. However, if you get big enough, you will want to have privileges to control the system at the level of its operating system (OS).

Compatibility – Generally speaking, standard software will work in a shared hosting environment (though you do need to make sure it fits the OS of the server).

No Skills – Because the system is managed by the host service, you don’t need to have high-level IT expertise to run a website. You can get a host and load your site without those skills. Again, if your site grows, you can always add levels of sophistication and hire tech people if needed to scale most appropriately.

Sharing is Caring – Sharing is considered one of the easiest and most efficient ways to express how much you care. If a customer complains, seeming to suggest that you don’t care about her or her order, explain to her that you’re sharing your server, and sharing is caring. If this doesn’t impress her, go into your room and loudly shut the door.

Sharing Doesn’t Always Fit

Sharing is not for every site. Larger sites will not find that sharing works well for them.

Here are three negatives regarding shared hosting solutions:

Site Performance – Your site should function reliably in most hosting environments until you get a higher amount of traffic than is typical. Large amounts of traffic can cause the site to become slower and less responsive. They can also incur higher overage fees if you’re on a shared plan.

Software & File Rules – You do not have control of a server in the same way if you are sharing. A shared server is a more communal environment – uptime and security of all businesses using it must be counted rather than just thinking of one client. Some functionalities you may want will not always be available.

Limited Resources – “Unlimited” does not always mean unlimited when it comes to bandwidth and space on the server. If you are drawing too much energy on the server –pulling too much of its strength on a regular basis – you will need to move to a new situation and often will be asked to upgrade by the hosting company to avoid frustrating other companies that are sharing the server with you.

Versatility – Shared hosting will not make sense if you require a great deal of custom software. The lower sophistication of shared hosting comparable to other solutions is something that will become of less interest as your business becomes more popular and you need more creative and dynamic ways to interact with your site’s visitors.

Reliability – Shared hosting is not considered as reliable as a dedicated or VPS hosting package is, for good reason. Reliability will always differ with regards to the quality of your host, of course – but the affordability of shared hosting also means your site is not as protected against the upswings in traffic or security breaches (below) that might occur with other companies on the server. Just as your site can suffer if it grows too fast when in a shared package, you will also be impacted negatively if another company on your server sees a major and sudden upswing in traffic.

Security – Anything involving hackers or malware – targeted attacks on a certain company or misuse of the system by another company – can be a threat to your site as well.

Control – You don’t have nearly as much control of your site in shared hosting as you do with other hosting options. This means that you will require the host’s help with support in ways that you would not with dedicated or VPS packages. If the support is not spectacular, your site will suffer.

Dedication – Sharing shows a profound lack of dedication. If a customer complains, seeming to suggest that you aren’t dedicated to her, explain to her that she’s right – you’re not dedicated to her or your server, that dedication is against company policy. If she says you should be, enter your room, crawl under your desk, and continue drafting your epic novel.

Summary & Conclusion

That should give you a basic idea of what shared hosting is, what your responsibilities are versus the responsibilities of the host, and some of the pros and cons. Shared is not a bad way to start out. Just make sure you know how to quickly shift to a higher-grade solution if your site experiences a sudden increase in traffic.

by Kent Roberts and Richard Norwood

Sources:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shared_web_hosting_service

http://www.webhostinghub.com/web-hosting-guide/what-you-should-know-about-shared-web-hosting/

http://www.hostsearch.com/q_shared.asp

Behold the Dusty Corners of the Internet

Today I’m taking a nostalgic look at the way the internet looked back in the as far as I could dig. Heck! even Digg has changed, so it doesn’t take much to become a relic of the internet.

Internet archaeology: behold the most hilarious abandoned websites

 
Internet archaeology: behold the most hilarious abandoned websites | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From www.wired.com – Today, 5:15 AM

There are still some corners of the web that look like they’re stuck in 1999 — and that’s a good thing.

Knowing these artifacts exist can actually be a comforting reminder of the internet that once was…

The Opte Project

 



 

From www.opte.org – July,2003

These maps are built off of our database using two different graphing engines: Large Graph Layout (LGL) by Alex Adai and Graphviz by Peter North at AT&T Labs Research. Each graphing engine produces wonderful displays, but they are only as good as the data and graphing language we provide. You can find our test images and some well produced full Internet maps…

This is the earliest graph I could find of the internet, a simple render of the internet structure off it’s backbones and IP addresses. Obviously there is some information missing, but, still fascinating to see the apparent simplicity of the internet in the early 2000’s.

 

The World Wide Web Around Google 2004 | Wikimedia Commons

 
File:WorldWideWebAroundGoogle.png - Wikimedia Commons | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From commons.wikimedia.org – July 2004
Created by Chris 73 | 18 Jul 2004 (UTC) using TouchGraph GoogleBrowser V1.01, which is based on the related function of google. Check out the tool yourself and learn some amazing new ways for visualizing your website connections on the web!

Personally I use Touchgraph for visualizing my social connections on Facebook, and find it very useful for redefining where my next focus should be when I start networking again. For webmasters, I expect the same thing should be possible, especially when considering your focus for Search Engine Optimization (SEO).

by – Juliana

 

 

 

Yahoo Denegrates Avatars, what to use instead?

A month ago Yahoo announced it was shutting down several of it’s services to yahoo mail users. The impact can now be felt among the Google communities where tech enthusiasts make use of many web apps.

Today is a sad day for Yahoo users – Joseph Prest | Google+

From plus.google.com – April 1, 8:45 PM

Today is a sad day for Yahoo users. The reason why I switched from Yahoo to Google is because they are basically shutting down connections to Yahoo Mail Classic to anyone except email. Today they shut down our avatars. Their excuse, “At Yahoo!, we’re focused on making your daily habits more inspiring and entertaining.

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

Joseph Prest isn’t the only one who likes playing with avatars, We particularly love his moving G+ avatar. Yahoo used to provide an avatar service, but like many good things, they come to an end… How many of you have heard the same story come from the likes of Aviary for example, who last year shut down their advanced editing services like Myrna for music and Pheonix for image editing. Aviary decided instead to focus on their “Photo Software”. Instead we have another Instagram clone, which doesn’t give us the exploration of cool tools that we geeks just love to experiment with.

 

Yahoo preparing to shut down 7 services – SlashGear

Yahoo preparing to shut down 7 services - SlashGear | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From www.slashgear.com – Today, 6:59 PM

It looks like the work-at-home program isn’t the only program Yahoo is shutting down. Yahoo is also planning on shutting down 7 other products…

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

Yahoo is shutting down 7  products that aren’t bringing in the kind of success Yahoo wants. Along with these products, Yahoo also plans on reducing their number of mobile apps from 60-75 to a measly 12-15. In streamlining their presence on the web, they are reducing their presence to us, and leaving little room for us to play. I personally think this is a bad decision, as all these nooks or experimental presences are what give the Brand a character and can inadvertently start communities.

Edwin Torres on Google+ finds another mobile based app (not as extensive as Yahoo Avatars), but definitely offering cool customization:

 

I found a fun little avatar app called WeeMee – Edwin Torres | Google+

Edwin Torres - Google+ - I found a fun little avatar app called WeeMee. It's… | How to Grow Your Business Online | Scoop.it

From plus.google.com – Today, 6:00 PM

I found a fun little avatar app called WeeMee. It’s available for iOS and Android, and it’s free.

Juliana Payson‘s insight:

I also like Face Your Manga, another free app for making avatars in the Anime style.

 

Are there any web apps and online services closing down you would like to see preserved or see alternatives for? Let me know and I’ll see what I can find. Alternatively you can start the discussion here on the blog! – Juliana